fbpx

62-year-old surgeon is photographer who allegedly baited endangered eagles with Styrofoam-stuffed fish

He has also been charged with littering.

Belmont Lay | June 8, 2016 @ 09:10 pm

Share

An orthopaedic surgeon has been charged in court on June 7, 2016, with using live fish injected with air to bait endangered birds, as well as littering, according to The Straits Times.

It turns out that the man seen in a video sent to Mothership.sg in October 2015 has been identified as Lee Soon Tai, 62, who runs a clinic at the Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre.

Lee, who faces four charges, allegedly committed both acts on two occasions last year in Bukit Batok Town Park.

On July 19, 2015, together with two other people, he is accused of feeding an endangered grey-headed fish eagle with live fish injected with air, between 2pm and 5pm.

The three of them are also accused of littering as they threw three dying fish into a pond at the park managed by the National Parks Board (NParks).

About one month later, on Aug. 16, Lee allegedly repeated both acts around the same time in the afternoon. This time he did it with three other people.

Feeding an animal and littering in a public park are offences under the Parks and Trees Act, and carries a fine of up to S$5,000 for each offence.

Identity revealed last year

In October 2015, there were already murmurings online that linked the orthopaedic surgeon with the photographer caught on video tampering with live fish as bait.

Multiple screenshots of the photos he took of birds in mid-flight as well as his Facebook posts and profile from Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre were uploaded online to triangulate evidence of his identity.

Now that he is charged in court, Lee’s identity is finally confirmed.

 

Related article:

Bird photographers in S’pore stuffed Styrofoam bits into live fish to bait endangered Grey-headed Fish Eagles

 

If you like what you read, follow us on Facebook and Twitter to get the latest updates.

About Belmont Lay

Belmont can pronounce "tchotchke".

Morning Commute

Interesting stories to discuss with your colleagues in office later

Close