Artist uses 15,000 burnt chopsticks to create mural depicting Singapore through the ages

All on the back of a flying Merlion.

Nyi Nyi Thet | May 19, 2016 @ 10:58 am

Red Hong Yi is an acclaimed Malaysian artist that does paintings and other pieces of artwork without using a paintbrush.

Here are some examples of the kind of art she produces. This is a mural of a bear done entirely with celery sticks dipped in green paint.

This is a silhouette of Darth Vader, created using only strategically placed tin foil in front of some light.

And here’s a Teh Tarik man made entirely out of teabags.

Ta-daaaa!! Here's the completed image of my "Teh Tarik Man" artwork made of 20,000 teabags! Video is on Youtube, link on my IG page! I spent two months creating this piece (thanks to all who helped!). Background info: I was commissioned to create a piece about my country, Malaysia, to display at the #worldeconomicforum . I wanted to show you guys a humble, everyday scene in Malaysia and was inspired by teh tarik (meaning pulled tea) – a national drink that's served in local cafes. I love the culture of people gathering in these cafes (called kopitiams) where they sit around to chat about everything – from weather to soccer to politics to food. There are also props like drink cans and an ice-shaving machine in the image that's typically seen in local cafes. The stream of teh tarik is connected between the foreground and background of the artwork. The taste and smell of teh tarik def reminds me of home…and I wanted to share a lil bit of home with you guys from all over the world 🌍❤️ photo by @jeremyblodephotography

A photo posted by red*hongyi (@redhongyi) on

It turns out, the 28-year-old recently channelled that creative energy onto the walls of the Facebook office in Singapore.

The Facebook office in Singapore wanted a mural on the 10-metre long wall beside their cafe, and in keeping with the theme of food, had requested the mural to be made entirely from chopsticks.

They turned to Yi to complete the mural, and she decided to take it up a notch. Not only did she exclusively use chopsticks, 15,000 to be exact, she decided to burn the chopsticks as well.

The mural consisted of both images of the past, including kampungs, a man on a sampan, and a few more recent sights.

Culminating in this work of art.

Screenshot from  Red Hong Yi's Facebook
Screenshot from Red Hong Yi’s Facebook

And here is a video depicting the painstaking process of creating the piece.

Yi described the meaning behind her mural as such:

This piece depicts the story of the Merlion – a mythical creature with the head of a lion and body of a fish, and its significance as Singapore’s national icon. The Merlion is the guardian of Singapore and has protected the country from waves, storms and enemies, from its early days as a village to where it is now. The Merlion is seen smiling as it is looking forward to the the future with enthusiasm and hope.

 

Top image from Red Hong Yi’s Facebook page

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About Nyi Nyi Thet

Thet has a chronic fear of teenage girls laughing at him. He sometimes puts on a cap in his room and yells “Gryffindor”.

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