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Mainland Chinese in Australia sing national anthem & shout curses at Hong Kong protesters

Hongkongers and mainland Chinese clash overseas.

Kayla Wong | August 19, 05:32 am

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Deepening political tensions in the Chinese Special Administrative Region (SAR) of Hong Kong have spilled over to foreign countries.

Students from mainland China and Hong Kong have clashed in Australia.

Face-off in Australia

And students from both sides have butted heads more than once ever since the anti-extradition bill protests started in Hong Kong in June.

On Aug. 16 and 17, Friday and Saturday, thousands of Hongkongers took to the streets in Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide in support of those protesting back home.

Tensions then ran high when pro-Beijing supporters showed up as well.

Twitter user Wu Lebao (@MerlotN), a self-professed mainland Chinese who sought asylum in Australia and is now a naturalised citizen, uploaded a couple of videos that captured the hostile treatment both sides received from each other.

CNMB

On Friday, Aug. 16, at the University of South Australia in Adelaide, Hong Kong protesters shouted, “Hong Kong, stay strong”.

In response, mainland Chinese nationalists shouted, “Cao ni ma bi” (CNMB), which means “f*** your mother’s c***”.

Some people, however, could be heard in the background laughing and saying in Mandarin Chinese, “What are they trying to do?”

Singing national anthem

Mainland Chinese nationalists even openly sang in unison at the various locations the Chinese national anthemMarch of the Volunteers.

“Call (me) daddy”

In Melbourne, Australia, during a march by the Hong Kong people on Friday night, the mainland Chinese who showed up could also be heard chanting, “Call (me) daddy”.

“Traitors”

Outside Melbourne’s State Library on Friday night, a Hong Kong woman was heard shouting in English, “If you can’t respect that (freedom of expression), why are you in Australia for the freedom? Why aren’t you studying in the great China?”

Thereafter, some people around her clapped and cheered.

In response, one mainland Chinese man present shouted, “Why are you in Australia too?”

The two then continued shouting at each other, with the woman saying she wants “freedom”, while the people around them either cheered for or booed the other side.

The mainland Chinese person then started chanting han jian (汉奸), which means “traitor” in Mandarin Chinese.

“Should just stop living”

A few ema (small wooden plaques) in Tokyo’s Meiji Shrine were spotted by a Taiwanese person to have death curses written on them.

‘Just stop living already’: Messages cursing Hong Kong & Taiwan found at popular Tokyo shrine

One of them read (translated from Chinese): “The families of those advocating for Hong Kong independence or Taiwan independence should just stop living.”

In response to such nationalistic displays from Chinese nationalists, netizens have their own comeback too, which might come off as being condescending to the former.

“Kid, you’re not the Chinese Communist Party, you’re just a Chinese national who’s using a smartphone.”

“Broke asses”

Such clashes happened in Canada as well.

At an anti-extradition bill protest held on Saturday at the Old City Hall in Canada, pro-Beijing marchers showed up too.

Waving the Chinese national flag, some of them turned up the engine sound of their sports car while chanting qiong bi (穷逼), which means “broke as hell” in Mandarin Chinese.

Suggesting that Taiwan or Hong Kong is separate from China is a big no-no

Chinese president Xi Jinping, in a warning for any region with the intention to be independent, has repeatedly made use of the Chinese saying “Blood is thicker than water” to suggest that ethnic Chinese regions rightfully belong to mainland China under the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

The Chinese can be extremely sensitive when it comes to thorny issues such as Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Companies that range from international fashion houses Versace to even Chinese tech giant Huawei have received significant backlash when they committed the one geopolitical faux pas they are not supposed to make, which is to remotely suggest Taiwan and Hong Kong are independent from China.

Committing the faux pas would incur the wrath of Chinese consumers by hurting their “national feelings”, a phrase that was often used by Beijing.

Background

Worst political crisis in Hong Kong

Hong Kong has entered its worst political crisis since the 1997 handover.

City-wide protests started in June against an extradition bill that has since been declared “dead” by Chief Executive Carrie Lam.

However, protesters want a complete withdrawal of the bill, saying that without doing so, the bill could be revived anytime by the Hong Kong government, especially after the protests lose momentum or die down.

Protesters have raised five demands to the government:

  1. To completely withdraw the extradition bill
  2. Stop classifying the clashes between police and protesters as “riots”
  3. Drop charges against all arrested demonstrators
  4. Order an independent inquiry into the police use of force against protesters
  5. Relaunch the stalled electoral reform process

Not everyone in Hong Kong is pleased about the 11-week long protests though:

Hongkongers bemoan empty streets, say Tsim Sha Tsui looks like a ghost town now

‘It’s your problem, not mine’: Foreign visitors stranded in Hong Kong airport confront protesters

And not all mainland Chinese are against the Hong Kong protesters:

Woman in China blocks emergency lane with Rolls-Royce, Chinese netizens say such behaviour is why they support Hong Kong

Related articles:

Global Times reporter attacked by Hong Kong protesters hailed as hero in China

Charmaine Sheh & Angelababy face backlash from Hongkongers after saying they love China

Disney’s Mulan actress Liu Yifei faces boycott calls after voicing support for HK police

Hong Kong billionaires now singled out as ‘the problem’ underlying protests

George Yeo says Hong Kong can never escape Beijing’s control, historian Wang Gungwu concurs

About Kayla Wong

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