MUIS clarifies no such thing as ‘halal-certified headscarves’

#2halal4u

By Guan Zhen Tan | October 13, 2017

In Singapore, being certified means you have credentials.

But “halal-certified headscarves”? Seriously?

In case you didn’t know, here’s a quick recap.

What was reported

The Straits Times reported that Vendmart at Giant in Tampines has 17 vending machines that dispense hot meals and other inedible objects.

Reporting the launch of Vendmart, ST had a caption for their video which raised many an eyebrow:

Realising the slip-up, ST has since changed the caption to “halal-certified products” instead.

Screenshot via The Straits Times’ Facebook page

Very halal

But the burning question remains: Is there even such a thing as halal headscarves?

Mothership.sg reached out to the official Twitter account of Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS) on halal food certification queries, and this is what they said:

Screenshot via Twitter

And also once again, they clarified about the misphrased caption in response to a tweet:

Translation: Now our tudungs have to be “halal-certified”, ok friends? @halalSG, please take note. Screenshot via HalalSG’s Twitter

Oh, and they threw in a sassy reply to boot:

Despite the hilarious and slightly embarrassing mix-up, we’re sure lots of people will definitely be coming to check out this particular vending machine, so all’s well ends well.

 

Straits Times reports vending machines selling ‘halal-certified headscarves’, everyone confused

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Top image via The Straits Times’ YouTube video 

About Guan Zhen Tan

Guan Zhen is a serial doodler with multiple pens with her wherever she goes. She loves listening to Visual Kei bands, Jamiroquai and random songs from the future-funk genre.

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